Father-Child Fun with Knock-Knock Jokes

Looking back on 2010, I didn’t laugh quite enough with my kids. How about you?

Well no matter how you did, I’m thinking it would be a good idea to launch 2011 with a refresher course in joke telling. After all, it’s a father’s responsibility to make sure his kids master the art of jokes, puns, and groaners. (Mom sure isn’t going to do it!)

Well what better place to start than with that classic form of wordplay known as the knock-knock joke? Ready?

First, Dad, you should know the history of the art form. But since that history is a little murky, I’m just going to make something up. Okay?

Early knock-knock jokes were based on real-life names of people who might actually come to your front door. Examples:

Knock knock.
Who’s there?
Justin.
Justin who?
Justin time! I thought you weren’t home.

hisp dad preschool son reading on bed laughingKnock knock.
Who’s there?
Isabel.
Isabel who?
Isabel working? I had to knock.

It wasn’t long before the punch line had nothing to do with someone standing at a door. Knock-knock jokes became just an excuse for making a pun out of people’s first names:

Knock knock.
Who’s there?
Dwayne.
Dwayne who?
Dwayne the bathtub, I’m dwowning.

Knock knock.
Who’s there?
Sarah.
Sarah who?
Sarah doctor in the house?

After decades of knock-knock jokes based solely on names, somehow it all changed. The person doing the knocking didn’t have to be a person. The trigger word could be a vegetable, an article of clothing, or anything really:

Knock knock.
Who’s there?
Lettuce.
Lettuce who?
Lettuce. Lettuce in, it’s cold out here.

Knock knock.
Who’s there?
Radio.
Radio who?
Radio not. Here I come.

Knock knock.
Who’s there?
Wooden shoe.
Wooden shoe who?
Wooden shoe like to know?

The next generation of knock-knock jokes had songs for the punchline. Usually classic folks songs or showtunes:

Knock knock.
Who’s there?
Freeze.
Freeze who?
Freeze a jolly good fellow, Freeze a jolly good fellow . . .

Knock knock.
Who’s there?
Sam and Janet.
Sam and Janet who?
Sam and Janet evening. You may find a stranger . . .

Knock knock.
Who’s there?
Aardvark.
Aardvark who?
Aardvark a million miles for one of your smiles . . .

Then the entire knock-knock joke world was turned upside down when joke tellers began to incorporate the “who” part of the response into the punchline. That idea gave new life to the genre.

Knock knock.
Who’s there?
Boo.
Boo who?
Well, it’s only a joke. You don’t have to cry about it.

Knock knock.
Who’s there?
Hatch.
Hatch who?
Gesundheit.

Knock knock.
Who’s there?
Little Old Lady.
Little Old Lady who?
Wow! I didn’t know you could yodel.

No chapter on knock-knock jokes can be complete without this classic that you know and love.

Knock knock.
Who’s there?
Banana.
Banana who?
Knock knock.
Who’s there?
Banana.
Banana who?
Knock knock.
Who’s there?
Banana.
Banana who?
Knock knock.
Who’s there?
Orange.
Orange who?
Orange you glad I didn’t say “banana” again?

Finally, here is the greatest knock-knock jokes of all time. Unfortunately it doesn’t come across very well in written form. But, try it out on someone you love and see how well it works.

Knock knock.
Who’s there?
Interrupting cow.
Interrupting — ?
MOO!

The word “moo” is funny all by itself, but if you say it before they finish their response, the effect is quite amusing. Try saying it loud or soft. It works both ways.

A few more words about knock-knock jokes before you go try them out on your kids:

First, it’s a total blast to teach them to a two- or three-year-old, even before their verbal skills and sense of irony is developed. You laugh and so they laugh and then you laugh some more. Later, when they do finally understand the word play in one of the jokes, their eyes get real big and you can actually witness a whole new world opening to them.

Second, once you wind them up, they won’t stop.

The internet is a never ending source of knock-knock jokes. Unfortunately, most are distasteful or just not very funny or clever. Still, websites filled with jokes and riddles can be a valuable resource for fathers, but like everything on the web, you need to use your discretion and judgment.

Knock knock.
Who’s there?
Woodshop.
Woodshop who?
Woodshop please log off this website and go tell your kid a joke!

 

jay-payleitner

52 Things Kids Need from their Dad by Jay PayleitnerJay K. Payleitner is author of the book 52 Things Kids Need from their Dad (Harvest House Publishers, 2010). He also writes the National Center’s featured blog, Fathers 52. Jay is also a marketing consultant, speaker, and fathering advocate, and helps produce Carey Casey’s Today’s Father radio program. Jay and his wife Rita have five children and live in Illinois.

 

Order Jay’s book today.



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